Sept. 14, 2022

#152 | Mental Illness is affecting the nation as Another NYPD Officer Commits Suicide.

#152 | Mental Illness is affecting the nation as Another NYPD Officer Commits Suicide.

A sad day for the NYPD as they lose another officer to suicide. If you have suicidal thoughts regardless of your age, race, gender, or profession…please seek help. Please talk to someone, anyone. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-cj-bronson-show/support

Transcript

Hey, what's going on guys, today is Wednesday, September 14 2022. And hope you have a good Wednesday. Hope you have a good hump day. Today's episode is a tough one. I mean, I kind of do a lot of tough episodes because I feel like those are the ones that aren't really being discussed. And this episode is one of the toughest one of the toughest. That's about a officer by the name of Scott Cohen ce o h n this officer, very young, 38 years old, works in NYPD and his body was just found. So let's jump into the story. very tragic story. So who was Scott Scott Cohen again his office with 90th precinct in Brooklyn. He had six years on the job guys, and also sang in the national national anthem at NYPD events. The his body was found on Tuesday evening after allegedly he jumped from the bridge from the Throgs Neck bridge the night before. I've left his keys his cell phone in the car parked right on the highway. According to other officers, they say quote, I know he wasn't happy on patrol. Another person said he wasn't happy with the treatment. Police are getting the current environment but that's not the that's not really a reason to want to kill yourself. Anyone can leave the job. It's just sad. He was a very friendly, pleasant guy. He was a vocalist for the NYPD. I was often asked to perform. God bless America because of his beautiful voice. They're saying it's Honda Civic was left on the northbound side of the bridge, which extends over the East River connecting Bronx and Queens. And they were alerted the TBT AE which is the Triborough Bridge and tunnel authority were alerted of a disabled vehicle on Monday night 10:20pm. They said the unknown person was circling the vehicle and apparently jumped. That it prompted a late night search bringing in all forms of law enforcement, FDNY, NYPD, even the US Coast Guard came in. And this again, if you don't know, Monday night was not a clear night, it was a very stormy night that night. So it was very difficult for them to see even several marine unit units arrived on scene to really try to find the body, find whoever was the effort was called off after a couple of hours and then resumed again on Tuesday. And so sad because you know, this is not the first officer to commit suicide. On average. 2019 there was 10 officers who committed suicide was four and 2020. I believe three and 21. And so far this year, this will be number four already. This is the fourth officer at the NYPD this year, and we're in September to commit suicide. Why is that? Do you think it's the benefits? Do you think it's the pay? Not good? Do you think it's the union's not treating them? Right? Maybe the captain, maybe his fellow officers, maybe the hazing? Well, I don't think it'd be the hazing. He's been there for what, six years? Right. 38 years old? Or is it six years on the job. One of his fellow officers says not reason to kill himself. He's not happy with the quality of treatment, the treatment the police are getting. But it's, you know, I'm not gonna sit here and component and compare between how things were under Trump and under Biden, as far as police are concerned. Because honestly, I don't believe the President made that big of a difference, as far as the governor or the mayor of the town, of the policies of the city has when it comes to crime. And I've said this before, and this is what upsets me is that, you know, I do these episodes every day. And these episodes are heartfelt. They take a lot out of me. Sometimes I have to do multiple takes. Although you may think, Oh, it's a 1530 minute episode doesn't take them that long. I do a lot of takes. Sometimes I'll say something and I'm like, oh shit, I gotta take that out. Let me start over. I don't edit. I try not to edit. So I just restart when we record from the beginning. And every time I do that, and every you know, it just like, reminds me of this is the world that we're in now. And it's so sad. This man signed up when he was 32. To protect and serve his community to protect those and you know, and really try to help make a difference in this world. And he signed up. And I'm pretty sure most officers do signed up. And it's not about the pay, they sign up because they wanted to make a difference. And this man, most likely thought he was making a difference. But and probably in the beginning, when he, you know, six years ago, we started he probably was, he was being treated like he was. Now, in the videos that I've seen, of people just skirt screaming, yelling, pushing, shoving, completely disrespecting the police, even when the police aren't there for them, that police can just be walking by or arresting another individual, and you or this other person has no idea what's going on sees the police and they just start going and harassing them verbally, sometimes even physically. And I know you might think that, oh, well, it's just a man, he's a cop grow up, get over it. You know, do a job for six years. And first year, you're told to hero in the last five, you're told you're not do that put you get up and go to work every day. And you got to look yourself in the mirror and say I'm the I am a hero, right? And then maybe, you know, you start questioning that maybe I'm not a hero. Everyone hates me. Maybe that's what happened to Scott. And I hope that's not happened to the to the officers. Again, you know, mental health affects everyone. It doesn't matter if your man, woman child, whatever pronoun gender you choose to go with. It's affecting everyone. And here's a man who could have reached out to the police department, maybe he was afraid to reach out and ask for help because he didn't want to get demoted, or he didn't want to get passed up for raises or whatever the case may be, or he didn't want to be made fun of in the in the with his brothers and sisters on the force. Maybe. Maybe that's possibility you could have gotten private practice, you had to have seen even online therapy, I promoted a couple of online therapy groups before on this website. I know there's a lot of there's a lot of options that this officer could have chose. If for whatever reason, they don't I haven't found that he has a family or if he has a wife or kids or anything, but I mean, that's and I know a couple officers. And I wouldn't want that for anybody, man. I mean, it's tough. I know bills add up and you know, maybe it was a gambling thing could be bills thing could be drugs thing it could be, but I'm leaning towards more of being a job thing. And that's heartbreaking to me. There really is. No one should be treated like that. I mean, we should treat each other with respect. It's one thing if they're disrespecting you. If they're disrespecting you, then that's a whole different story. They're disrespecting you than I understand that you want to disrespect back because that's to me that's almost like human nature. But to see a stranger and not know him as you know, he's a stranger. You don't know him from Adam. You don't know him from anybody. You just see a uniform, and you immediately start hating. That's almost prejudice. Isn't that prejudice? Maybe that's something to do with it. Of course we don't we're not going to know unless this guy left a note which doesn't seem like he did. But yeah, he was struggling mentally I'm, I'm pretty sure think about that. You wake up early every night you get up you put your badge on your thing. You go out the door today I'm going to make a difference and then the first call you get somebody or you know maybe I'm exaggerating what's possible. First call you get somebody calls you this and calls you this says your this your that your garbage or bacon, your whatever your bitch, whatever the fuck they're saying. And, you know, it probably gets demoralizing because it gets demotivating. And it gets very depressing. So it's taking a toll on your mental state and your ego. And you got to just brush that off. I guess. So I guess being an officer these days, you got to be able to take a lot of criticism, which is maybe that's something we need to start training for. Maybe that's something we need to add to the curriculum and police academy. I don't know if they have that. But maybe something they need to do is somehow build that mental toughness or build that. Yeah. Ability to take that kind of criticism again, I don't know. I'm just speculating here. What could have pushed him over the edge? He was six years in. That's all we know. But you know, we know the other officer says he wasn't. He wasn't really happy being there. He could have just quit. It's a good point. When you get 60 years, and in his mind, he's probably like, I have only 14 years more to go or whatever, to retirement. 20 years. I don't know what retirement is, you know, and maybe he's trying to tough it out. And maybe he thought things would get better. Maybe his other associates were like, listen, things are gonna get better. Or maybe you could transfer to another department. And maybe the transfer didn't go through. And you know, I'm not gonna make excuses for it. I mean, suicide is is a horrible thing. It just sucks that I know, we're, we're already down. So many officers this year, a lot of them just left the city and moved to Florida moved to other states that are welcoming. You know, the more that go, whether they retire or whether they you know, are injured or transfer or suicide, or get commit suicide, you know, that's just still they're still gone. Right? And we already have anarchy and chaos in the city. It's not getting any better, and how is it gonna get better when we have a police station that's getting smaller. And again, you also got to put blame on the judicial system, right? These court systems are supposed to designed to keep criminals behind bars and not let them free. And maybe he got frustrated with that too, because I get frustrated with that. How many people I've talked about sucker punch somebody and get released the next day. Or the person who gets who defends themselves goes to jail, Rikers Island for weeks at a time. Jose Alba bodega, Bodega worker. I don't know. But it's a sad day. In my opinion, I feel like you know, this should be made more analysis, and I think they really need to start understanding that. Not everyone is bad. Not every cop is bad. Not every cop is good. Not every person you know, but that's just everything in life. And that people aren't, you know, behind the uniform. There's a human being behind every uniform. There's a human being until robots come out. That's still a human beings and they, they have feelings, they have emotions, you don't know what's going on with their mental state. And I'm not telling you that cops are nuts. I'm just saying, you know, I'm not saying the cops are bitches or whatever. I'm saying, treat everybody with respect. Treat everybody with respect, unless they disrespect you. Why are you disrespecting people? First, it makes you look an asshole. You're just an asshole. Walk around with an attitude. Give everybody a fucking attitude because of their uniform. Does not just make you an asshole. I'm just saying. Let me know what you guys think. Comment below again, hit me up on Twitter at CJ Bronson show. Tick tock episode is out at CJ Boston show on tick tock and again. Be safe. Keep your head on a swivel, please at all times. Be alert. Don't forget guys. I love y'all. Bye bye bye.